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ART STORIA | Literary Arts

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SERIES 2
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BOOK 1:

Dracula

by Bram Stoker, Edited with Foreword by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Arantzazu Martinez

Love and death and eternity... Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It introduced the character of Count Dracula and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy.

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BOOK 2:

The Count of Monte Cristo

by Alexandre Dumas, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Randy H. Sooknanan

Love, Devotion, and Redemption. The Count of Monte Cristo is a story of revenge and redemption, but Dumas presents both revenge and redemption as being motivated by love. It is a swashbuckling classic of romance, betrayal, and revenge. On the very day of his wedding to the beautiful Mercedes, young Edmund Dantes is framed by three men, arrested and thrown into the notorious prison Chateau d’If. Befriended by a fellow prisoner, he plots a daring escape, unearths a secret fortune and returns to Marseilles and Paris disguised as the mysterious Count of Monte Cristo, determined to seek vengeance on the men who framed him.

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BOOK 3:

The Iliad

by Homer, Translated by Samuel Butler, Edited with Foreword by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Charles-Antoine Coypel

Love and friendship, fate and free will, and honor are the main themes of Homer's The Iliad. All three themes follow Achilles and the other main characters of the epic poem. We see how Achilles' friendship with Patroclus and his hunger for honor guides much of the epic, which lead to both his and Hector's demises.

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BOOK 4:

The Odyssey

by Homer, Translated by Samuel Butler, Edited with Foreword by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by John William Waterhouse

The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is one of the oldest extant works of literature still read by contemporary audiences. As with the Iliad, the poem is divided into 24 books. It follows the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the Trojan War.

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BOOK 5:

The Mysterious Island

by Jules Verne, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Randy H. Sooknanan

Innovation and ambition... Jules Verne's Mysterious Island mingles science and fantasy. The relation between humans and natural resources is one of the main themes of the novel. Characters are running through technological history, until metallurgy, chemistry and even electricity were mastered.

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BOOK 5:

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Randy H. Sooknanan

Throughout The Time Machine, Wells shatters several common assumptions of human thought (for example, the belief in the inevitable progress of the species, the notion that technology will make human life better, and the insistence that people are at the center of the universe and will endure forever. Notable themes explored in the story include that of Fear and Kindness.

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BOOK 6:

A Study in Scarlet

by Arthur Conan Doyle, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Kromdor 

A Study in Scarlet is an 1887 detective novel written by Arthur Conan Doyle. The story marks the first appearance of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, who would become the most famous detective duo in popular fiction. The major themes in A Study in Scarlet are deductive/adductive reasoning, the ineffectiveness of public protection, religion, revenge modernism and friendship.

Also available:

> Sherlock Holmes: A Study in Scarlet & A Scandal in Bohemia Deluxe Edition 

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BOOK 7:

The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

by Robert Louis Stevenson, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Oswin Neumann 

Good versus Evil. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a Gothic novella by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. The story centers upon a conception of the duality of human nature. and is an allegory about the good and evil that exist in all men, At the core of the tale, we find the struggle with the two sides of any personality. The novella highlights the battle between good and evil that rages within the individual.

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BOOK 8:

The Big Sleep

by Raymond Chandler, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by DapperNoir 

The Big Sleep (1939) is an example of a prototypical hardboiled crime novel, it was written by Raymond Chandler, and is the first to feature his iconic detective character Philip Marlowe. The first noticeable theme in the novel is the Corruption of Society. Raymond Chandler's crime noir novel The Big Sleep deals with the dark underbelly of L.A. society. Wealth, Status, and Social Mobility. Cynicism and Survival. Masculinity. The other major theme of the story is the different levels of American society at the time period.

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BOOK 9:

Meditations

by Marcus Aurelius, Translated by George W. Chrystal, Edited with Foreword by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Peter Arnell

Meditations is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD, recording his private notes to himself and ideas on Stoic philosophy. Marcus Aurelius wrote the 12 books of the Meditations in Koine Greek as a source for his own guidance and self-improvement. 

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BOOK 10:

The Symposium

by Plato, Translated by Benjamin Jowett, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Anselm Feuerbach

The Symposium is a philosophical text by Plato dated c. 385–370 BC. It depicts a friendly contest of extemporaneous speeches given by a group of notable men attending a banquet. The men include the philosopher Socrates, the general and political figure Alcibiades, and the comic playwright Aristophanes.

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BOOK 11:

The Sea Wolf

by Jack London, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Willem van de Velde

The Sea-Wolf is a 1904 psychological adventure novel by American writer Jack London. The book's protagonist, Humphrey Van Weyden, is a literary critic who is a survivor of an ocean collision and who comes under the dominance of Wolf Larsen, the powerful and amoral sea captain who rescues him.

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BOOK 12:

A Journal of the Plague Year

by Daniel Defoe, Edited with Introduction by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Jan Brueghel the Elder

A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe is an account of one man's experiences of the year 1665, in which the bubonic plague struck the city of London in what became known as the Great Plague of London, the last epidemic of plague in that city. The Great Plague claimed nearly 100,000 lives. This makes A Journal of the Plague Year, originally published in March 1722, an imaginative reconstruction. The book is told somewhat chronologically, though without sections or chapter headings. Presented as an eyewitness account of the events at the time, it was written in the years just prior to the book's first publication. In the story, Defoe goes to great pains to achieve an effect of verisimilitude, identifying specific neighborhoods, streets, and even houses in which events took place. Additionally, it provides tables of casualty figures and discusses the credibility of various accounts and anecdotes received by the narrator. The novel is often compared to the actual, contemporary accounts of the plague in the diary of Samuel Pepys. Defoe's account, which appears to include much research, is far more systematic and detailed than Pepys's first-person account.

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BOOK 13:

The Turn of the Screw

by Henry James, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw is an 1898 horror novella by Henry James. The novella about a naive young governess and her desperate but misguided efforts to shield two children from a pair of predatory wraiths at a lonely country estate may well be the most important ghost story written in the English language. Its main theme is an action that makes a bad situation worse, especially one that forces someone to do something.

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BOOK 14:

The Republic

by Plato, Edited with Introduction by Randy H. Sooknanan, Cover Art by Hans Werner Schmidt 

The Republic is a Socratic dialogue, authored by Plato around 375 BC, concerning justice, the order and character of the just city-state, and the just man. It is Plato's best-known work and has proven to be one of the world's most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually and historically.