Image by 🇸🇮 Janko Ferlič

ART STORIA | Literary Arts

Untitled.png
SERIES 4
BOOK #41-56
The Sun Also Rises ebook.jpg

BOOK 1:

The Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Claude Monet

The Sun Also Rises is a 1926 novel by American writer Ernest Hemingway, his first, that portrays American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights.

The Land That Time Forgot ebook.jpg

BOOK 2:

The Land That Time Forgot

by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Milomingo

The Land That Time Forgot is a fantasy novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Caspak trilogy. His working title for the story was "The Lost U-Boat." The sequence was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a three-part serial in the issues for August, October, and December 1918.

Gullivers Travels ebook.jpg

BOOK 3:

Gulliver's Travels

by Jonathan Swift, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art: On the island of Lilliput a colour print from an 1860s edition of Gulliver’s Travels

Gulliver's Travels aka Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships is a 1726 prose satire by the Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift, satirising both human nature and the "travelers' tales" literary subgenre.

Siddhartha ebook.jpg

BOOK 4:

Siddhartha: An Indian Tale

by Herman Hesse, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Dong Lin

Siddhartha: An Indian Tale is a 1922 novel by Hermann Hesse that deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery of a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha. The book, Hesse's 9th novel, was written in German, in a simple, lyrical style. In the novel, Siddhartha, a young man, leaves his family for a contemplative life, then, restless, discards it for one of the flesh. He conceives a son, but bored and sickened by lust and greed, moves on again. Near despair, Siddhartha comes to a river where he hears a unique sound. This sound signals the true beginning of his life -- the beginning of suffering, rejection, peace, and, finally, wisdom. Herman Hesse's classic novel has delighted, inspired, and influenced generations of readers, writers, and thinkers. In this story of a wealthy Indian Brahmin who casts off a life of privilege to seek spiritual fulfillment, Hesse synthesizes disparate philosophies--Eastern religions, Jungian archetypes, Western individualism--into a unique vision of life as expressed through one man's search for true meaning.

Book of the Dead ebook 2.jpg

BOOK 5:

The Egyptian Book of the Dead

by E. A. Wallis Budge, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art: Book of the Dead of Hunefer (Hw-nfr) 19th Dynasty

The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text which was generally written on papyrus and used from the beginning of the New Kingdom to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw, is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day or Book of Emerging Forth into the Light.

In the year 1888, Dr. E. Wallis Budge, then purchasing agent for the British Museum, followed rumors he heard of a spectacular archeological find in Upper Egypt, and found in an 18th Dynasty tomb near Luxor "the largest roll of papyrus I had ever seen, tied with a thick band of papyrus, and in a perfect state of preservation." It was a copy of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, written around 1500 B.C. for Ani, Royal Scribe of Thebes, Overseer of the Granaries of the Lords of Abydos, and Scribe of the Offerings of the Lord of Thebes. This Papyrus of Ani, a full version of the Theban recension, is presented here by Dr. Budge, who later became perhaps the world's most renowned Egyptologist.

The Castle of Otranto ebook HQ.jpg

BOOK 6:

The Castle of Otranto

by Horace Walpole, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by DerMonkey

The Castle of Otranto is a novel by Horace Walpole. First published in 1764, it is generally regarded as the first gothic novel. In the second edition, Walpole applied the word 'Gothic' to the novel in the subtitle – A Gothic Story. The Castle of Otranto is purported to be a translation of an Italian story of the time of the crusades. In it Walpole attempted, as he declared in the Preface to the Second Edition, "to blend the two kinds of romance: the ancient and the modern." Crammed with invention, entertainment, terror, and pathos, the novel was an immediate success and Walpole's own favorite among his numerous works. 

Doctor Moreau ebook.jpg

BOOK 7:

The Island of Doctor Moreau

by H. G. Wells, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by DerMonkey

The Island of Doctor Moreau is an early example of the mad scientist story. Ranked among the classic novels of the English language and the inspiration for several unforgettable movies, this early work of H. G. Wells was greeted in 1896 by howls of protest from reviewers, who found it horrifying and blasphemous. They wanted to know more about the wondrous possibilities of science shown in his first book, The Time Machine, not its potential for misuse and terror. In The Island of Dr. Moreau, a shipwrecked gentleman named Edward Prendick, stranded on a Pacific island lorded over by the notorious Dr. Moreau, confronts dark secrets, strange creatures, and a reason to run for his life.

The Voyage of the Argo.jpg

BOOK 8:

The Voyage of the Argo

by Apollonius Rhodius, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Jacopo da Sellaio

The Voyage of the Argo aka The Argonautica is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from remote Colchis.

Also available:

> Jason and the Argonauts   

                        & 

 > Jason and the Golden Fleece

King Arthur 2 ebook.jpg

BOOK 9:

Stories of King Arthur and His Knights

by U. Waldo Cutler, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art: "The Arming and Departure of the Knights" scene from a 1890s Holy Grail Tapestry by Unknown Artist

This is reproduction of the original: Stories of King Arthur and His Knights by Cutler U. Waldo. The material for the Arthur stories came from many countries and from many different periods of history. Much of it is wholly fanciful, but the writers connected all the incidents directly or indirectly with the old Briton king of the fifth century, who was the model of knighthood, "without fear and without reproach." Perhaps there was a real King Arthur, who led the Britons against the Saxon invaders of their land, who was killed by his traitor nephew, and who was buried at Glastonbury,-the valley of Avilion of the legends; perhaps there was a slight historical nucleus around which all the romantic material was crystallising through the centuries, but the Arthur of romance came largely from the imagination of the early writers. And yet, though our "own ideal knight" may never have trod the soil of Britain or Roman or Saxon England, his chivalrous character and the knightly deeds of his followers are real to us, if we read them rightly, for "the poet's ideal was the truest truth."

Arabian Nights 2 ebook.jpg

BOOK 10:

The Arabian Nights

Translated by Andrew Lang, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Kay Rasmus Nielsen

"The Arabian Nights" is the title which encompasses all of the Persian, Arabian and Indian folk tales which have made their way into western culture over hundreds of years. This collection was edited by Andrew Lang, and his selections were made with the purpose of making the tales more suitable and interesting to a general audience.

1984 ebook.jpg

BOOK 11:

1984

by George Orwell, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Trash Riot

Nineteen Eighty-Four (also stylised as 1984) is a dystopian social science fiction novel and cautionary tale written by English writer George Orwell. It was published in June 1949 and was Orwell's ninth and final book completed in his lifetime. Thematically, it centres on the consequences of totalitarianism, mass surveillance and repressive regimentation of people and behaviours within society. Orwell, a democratic socialist, modelled the totalitarian government in the novel after Stalinist Russia and Nazi Germany. More broadly, the novel examines the role of truth and facts within politics and the ways in which they are manipulated.

Siegfried 2 ebook.jpg

BOOK 12:

The Story of Siegfried

by James Baldwin, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Peter von Cornelius

This version offers a clearer understanding and a wiser appreciation of the thoughts and feelings of our old northern ancestors. The story of Siegfried, the brave young man who rode through fire to awaken the lovely Brunhild from a long sleep, has been told many times and in many variations. James Baldwin's account, written well over 100 years ago, has taken bits and pieces from many different versions. The result is an adventure-packed retelling of tales describing "The Curse of Gold," "Nibelungen Land," "The Journey to Burgundy-Land," "How Spring-Time Came," "The War with the North-Kings," and fifteen other stories taken from ancient Icelandic texts known as the Eddas.
 

This captivating collection transports readers across a supernatural bridge to a world of dragons, giants, and gods, delighting adventure lovers with its rich selection of timeless tales.

Socrates ebook.jpg

BOOK 13:

The Last Days Of Socrates

by Plato, Translated by Benjamin Jowett & Henry Cary, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Jacques-Louis David

This edition includes all four Socratic dialogues of the Euthyphro, The Apology, Crito, and Phaedo. Euthyphro, by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue whose events occur in the weeks before the trial of Socrates, between Socrates and Euthyphro. The dialogue covers subjects such as the meaning of piety and justice. As is common with Plato's earliest dialogues, it ends in aporia. The Apology of Socrates, written by Plato, is a Socratic dialogue of the speech of legal self-defence which Socrates (469–399 BC) spoke at his trial for impiety and corruption in 399 BC. Crito is a dialogue that depicts a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy friend Crito of Alopece regarding justice, injustice, and the appropriate response to injustice after Socrates' imprisonment, which is chronicled in the Apology. Phaedo, also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The philosophical subject of the dialogue is the immortality of the soul.

The Trial ebook.jpg

BOOK 14:

The Trial

by Franz Kafka, Translated by David Wyllie, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Félix Labisse

The Trial is a novel written by Franz Kafka between 1914 and 1915 and published posthumously in 1925. One of his best-known works, it tells the story of a man, Josef K., who is arrested and prosecuted by a remote, inaccessible authority, with the nature of his crime revealed neither to him nor to the reader. Heavily influenced by Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, Kafka even went so far as to call Dostoevsky a blood relative. Like Kafka's two other novels, The Trial was never completed, although it does include a chapter which appears to bring the story to an intentionally abrupt ending. After Kafka's death in 1924 his friend and literary executor, Max Brod, put the author's text and remaining manuscript together in Berlin for publication in German. This edition is translanted by David Wyllie.

Maltese Falcon ebook.jpg

BOOK 15:

The Maltese Falcon

by Dashiell Hammett, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Lizzie Houldsworth

The Maltese Falcon is a 1930 detective novel by American writer Dashiell Hammett, originally serialized in the magazine Black Mask beginning with the September 1929 issue. The story is told entirely in external third-person narrative; there is no description whatsoever of any character's thoughts or feelings, only what they say and do, and how they look. The novel has been adapted several times for the cinema. The main character, Sam Spade (who also appeared later in some lesser-known short stories), was a departure from Hammett's nameless detective, The Continental Op. Spade combined several features of previous detectives, notably his cold detachment, keen eye for detail, unflinching and sometimes ruthless determination to achieve his own form of justice, and a complete lack of sentimentality. 

80 Days ebook.jpg

BOOK 16:

Around the World in Eighty Days

by Dashiell Hammett, Edited by Randy H. Sooknanan & Denise K. McTighe, Cover Art by Lizzie Houldsworth

The Maltese Falcon is a 1930 detective novel by American writer Dashiell Hammett, originally serialized in the magazine Black Mask beginning with the September 1929 issue. The story is told entirely in external third-person narrative; there is no description whatsoever of any character's thoughts or feelings, only what they say and do, and how they look. The novel has been adapted several times for the cinema. The main character, Sam Spade (who also appeared later in some lesser-known short stories), was a departure from Hammett's nameless detective, The Continental Op. Spade combined several features of previous detectives, notably his cold detachment, keen eye for detail, unflinching and sometimes ruthless determination to achieve his own form of justice, and a complete lack of sentimentality.